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Contractor Forms and Letters for Projects

Forms, contracts, and letters written to be utilized for projects and jobs.

Contractor Forms and Letters (Complete 150 Doc Package) SAVE $$$

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Addendum Letter

This is a simple cover letter for a new addendum on a project that is bidding. Notice that it requests a phone call if there are any questions or difficulties. When sending addenda, make sure that you are very careful in numbering, statements of bid date and time changes, and assuring that every bidder gets a copy. This is true not only for the architect that must send out addenda, but also for the general contractor and subcontractor who must keep addenda flowing downstream without delay.

Price: $5.00 USD

Bid Form

This is a basic form used for clarifying which price pertains to which bid item. These can be very useful on a hectic bid day. Mistakes at these times can be very costly.

Price: $5.00 USD

Bid Letter

This is a cover letter for a bid submitted by a subcontractor to a general contractor. This is a very basic letter, but it provides a nice, professional touch when submitting a bid.

Price: $5.00 USD

Bid Notes

This type of form is generally used for a formal submission of the bid.

Price: $5.00 USD

Bid Receipt Log

This is a very handy form to have on bid days when phone bids are coming in fast. It contains places for the necessary information and will help you remain organized while under stress.

Price: $5.00 USD

Bid Submission Log

This one is for noting all of your outgoing bids. On a busy day, this form can save you from a lot of pain.

Price: $5.00 USD

Bidder – No Plans Letter

This is a request for bid documents and is to be included in the bid. This letter can be used by a variety of companies. It can be sent from a subcontractor to a general contractor, from a general contractor to an architect, or from a general contractor to an owner.

Price: $5.00 USD

Certification of Satisfaction of Lien

This certificate states that a previously filed lien has been satisfied and its demands met. Thus the lien is retired by this legal certificate.

Price: $5.00 USD

Change Order

This is a basic change order form. Failure to get this form properly authorized (signed by a responsible party) results in about half of all change orders going unpaid.

Price: $5.00 USD

Change Order Letter

This is another type of verification of extra work. Many contractors have used this type of verification instead of a change proposal. While it is certainly better to use this rather than nothing, it would be far better to get formal approval in advance. This letter is not only a friendly confirmation of a work order, but it is also a legal statement of what you are about to do. After receiving this letter, the other company can never claim ignorance of the situation. Since most unpaid extras are justified by some type of ignorance, this letter can be very helpful. Note also that the letter says you will be billing this extra work in the same way as you do for small jobs. If this will provide a difficulty for your accounting system, change the wording of this section.

Price: $5.00 USD

Change Proposal Summary

This is a notice of past-due invoices and a request for immediate payment.

Price: $5.00 USD

Conditional Waiver and Release Letter

This is a final payment letter, releasing the owner or contractor from all obligations to the party being paid.

Price: $5.00 USD

Conflict Letter

Since the architectural and engineering firms are the ones that specify how the project will be constructed, they are the final arbiters on conflicts between different trades. When these situations do arise, it is your obligation to immediately resolve the situation; avoiding it will only allow the problem to grow. To solve the problem you must involve the architect or engineer or both in some cases. In such communications there are two basic rules to be followed:
1. Do not lay blame on the architect or engineer.
2. Provide a solution to the problem.
You must always ask for the specifier's approval before going ahead with any changes, but designing the changes beforehand provides advantages. First, it often makes the specifier's life a bit easier. Second, it allows you to specify your own answer to the problem. Obviously, you will have to be fair, but providing an answer often allows you to do things your own way.

Price: $5.00 USD

Daily Construction Report

This is a daily report for a construction project, generally to be filled out by the foreman of a single trade.

Price: $5.00 USD

Daily Log

This is a daily report for a construction project, generally to be filled out by a general superintendent. It contains space for data on many trades.

Price: $5.00 USD

Daily Work Sheet

This is a basic record of what is used on a job on a particular day. Such forms can be useful, but beware of over use. (Why waste worker time on accounting tools that will never actually be used?)

Price: $5.00 USD

Delay Notice Letter – Other Trade

This is very similar to the previous letter, except that it does not specify the specific cause of the delay, but instead explains the effects of the delays. This letter is not about delays your company may have caused, but about delays caused by others. There may be situations where you want to talk about the delay not being your fault, but you don't yet want to point the finger at someone else. In such cases, a letter like this will work very well. With some modification this letter could be used by a general contractor or construction manager as well as by a subcontractor.

Price: $5.00 USD

Design Build Introduction Letter

This letter is written regarding a project that is being bid by the formal process. (Designed by an architect, bid to the owner according to plans and specs.) If, rather than simply bidding according to plans and specs, you find changes that could be made in the project to save money, you may gain a competitive advantage by designing the project to be less expensive, yet with the same quality standards. In this letter, you should outline the changes you wish to make, explain why they don't really affect the quality of the installation, and give the owner a figure as to how much money the changes will save.

Price: $5.00 USD

Design Estimate Letter

This is a blank proposal form for a design estimate. Note several things about it: First of all, it references the other communications you have had regarding the project. Second, it leaves you a space for filling in the design details. Explain the key parts of the design and the benefits of or reasons for the choice of these methods. Third, the form leaves you space for filling in each item on a pricing list. For a design estimate you must price each line item so that the owner can see exactly what he or she is paying for.

In many cases, an architectural firm is called upon by the owner to prepare a basic design; and then the contractor (you) is called in to design the actual implementation of the architect's generic design. In such cases, you should reference the architect and the date of the plans and specifications you worked from. This letter, as it appears here, is written in this way. If, instead, your firm has handled all of the design details from the beginning, you will need to modify this paragraph. Instead of referencing the architectural company, note that the plans, specifications, and design criteria were developed by your firm and note the date of the final design documents. After the owner reviews and modifies the estimate, you will prepare a formal contract for construction and then go to work.

Price: $5.00 USD

Design/Build Authorization Letter

This is the initial agreement in the design/build process. It authorizes the contractor to spend the necessary time and effort to establish a basic design and budget. The contractor will be paid for these services (the exact amount will be specified in this letter), with that amount being credited to the total design fee, should the project proceed to the construction stage. Notice that this letter is to be counter-signed by the recipient, and a copy should be returned to you.

Price: $5.00 USD

Design/Build Cover Letter

This is a cover letter for a design/build contract proposal. It reports to the customer that you have completed the basic design for the project, which the previous letter authorized you to do. The letter then informs the customer that the next step is to prepare complete construction drawings. It also mentions that you have also completed a detailed schedule for the completion of the project by the designated date.

Price: $5.00 USD

Design/Build Modification Letter

This letter is a cover letter to the formal "plans and specs" bid. In it you identify the bid documents and acknowledge that you are bidding according to them. Then you detail the money saving design advantages that you have found and itemize their costs.

Price: $5.00 USD

Estimate

This is a very basic form for itemized estimates. Show items, quantities, material costs, and labor hours to install each item. Then multiply material and labor by quantity and add the columns.

Price: $5.00 USD

FHA Cost Breakdown Form

Use this to provide cost information to the Federal Housing Administration in a form they accept.

Price: $5.00 USD

General Delay Notice Letter

Because of the big threats of litigation and liquidated damages, delays (or rather, being blamed for the delays) can be a very serious liability. Letters such as the ones you find here are crucial in the avoidance of blame. Documentation almost always holds up in court-remembered conversations very rarely do. This letter is in response to delays that are being caused by others, and should usually be used by subcontractors. (They could be used by general contractors if modified.) It is especially applicable to those trades that tend to finish last (electrical, painters, carpet layers, etc.) Note that you should send this letter at the first sign of trouble brewing. This letter is essentially a preventative measure.
By sending it you are informing the recipient that:
1. He has been notified that you are not the cause of this problem and will not be held responsible.
2. You are building a legal record of your innocence in this matter, and he will not be able to win any lawsuit against you.
You are initiating the discussion, and the recipient of the letter will be reacting to your letter; which means that you are preparing the battlefield before any arrows fly.

Price: $5.00 USD

Hazmat Submittal Letter

The documentation and handling of hazardous materials (often shortened to "hazmat") are largely a paperwork problem. The amount of paperwork, however, depends on the types of materials that will be used in the project. Although these regulations seem rather needless, do not underestimate the power of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to enforce them. Like OSHA, and even more, they can penalize your company heavily for even a minor infraction. This is a cover letter to be included with hazmat information sheets that you are supplying to your customer. Note that the letter is used to shift some of the responsibility to the recipient of the letter, or at least off of you and your company. The letter says that you believe the sheets to be in compliance with the law, but that the other party should notify you if this is not so.

Price: $5.00 USD

Job Problem Letter

This is an on-the-job form designed to document the situation and to get a speedy resolution.

Price: $5.00 USD

Job Site Safety Report

This is for use during a job site inspection.

Price: $5.00 USD

Material Report

This is a form that you give to project supervisors, foremen, etc. It can be useful for job management and documentation of job issues. It is similar to a daily log, but focused on materials.

Price: $5.00 USD

Material Schedule

Basic form to itemize quantities and uses of materials.

Price: $5.00 USD

Notice of Completion Letter

This is a cover letter to be sent with the project close-out documents. In essence, it says, "Okay, we finished the project, here is the final paperwork, now pay me."

Price: $5.00 USD

Notice of Intention to File a Mechanic’s Lien

This is a notice to a property owner that you intend to file a lien against a certain piece of property. It specifies the amount of the lien and the legal description of the property.

Price: $5.00 USD

Pre-Job Planning Topics

This is a job planning checklist designed primarily for a subcontractor. The last several questions are specific to an electrical contractor; you may change them as required for your company.

Price: $5.00 USD

Procurement Schedule

Use this to keep track of materials on a large job where many items must be approved, ordered long in advance, and so on.

Price: $5.00 USD

Progress Chart

Use this form to keep track of actual progress on a job. It is very useful for comparison with estimated progress. Where the two diverge, you need to find out why. This will enable you to find and correct inaccuracies between your estimates and progress on the job site.

Price: $5.00 USD

Project Close-out Checklist

This is a project close-out checklist designed for a general contractor.

Price: $5.00 USD

Project Estimate Form

This is a large, detailed form for a large, complex general construction project.

Price: $5.00 USD

Project Management Checklist

This is a project checklist designed for a general contractor or other project manager.

Price: $5.00 USD

Project Startup Checklist

This is a project start-up checklist designed for a general contractor.

Price: $5.00 USD

Pull Off Letter # 1

This is a notice of intent to pull off a job, from a subcontractor to a general contractor, from a general contractor to an owner, or from a specialty contractor to a subcontractor. It says that you are being forced to pull off of the project. Note that it references other letters that have been sent previously and says that you will have to charge for mobilization and demobilization expenses if you are forced to pull off. Note also that the letter says that you specified mobilization and demobilization on your original schedule of values. (You should always do this. The little bit of extra effort it takes will allow you a lot of negotiating room in many different circumstances.)

The final paragraph of the letter is conciliatory, without giving away any ground. You are simply sorry that the situation worked out poorly, and you would like to resolve it well. You are not, however, accepting any blame. If the situation looks bad, you should send this letter by certified, return-receipt mail.

Price: $5.00 USD

Pull Off Letter #2

This is a very serious letter regarding a situation that could easily end up in litigation. Such a letter should be sent by certified mail so that you have proof of delivery. In this letter you will establish your legal framework by referencing the previous letters you have sent, by requesting a response, and by informing the other party that you will be seeking legal counsel. Note that the letter says that you will not be forced into accepting any risks beyond those that are specified in your contract. This is where many construction companies get themselves in trouble. Go no further than your contract mandates. You have no legal or moral obligation to go any farther than that point, and, in fact, you are jeopardizing your company, your employees, and their families if you do.

Price: $5.00 USD

Punch List

This is a basic end-of-project "punch list."

Price: $5.00 USD

Subcontractor Problem Letter

This letter is either from a general contractor to a subcontractor or from a subcontractor to a specialty contractor and is written in response to poor performance by the recipient. As with most of these letters, this one has a dual purpose-to remedy the situation and to legally protect the writer if the situation is not remedied. In such a situation, you want to be sympathetic to the other contractor's difficulties, but you can not allow them to put you, your company, and your employees at risk. At the end of the letter, further action is threatened should the situation not be immediately resolved.

Price: $5.00 USD

Submittal Letter

This is cover letter for a set of submittals. Since one of the main concerns with submittals is that you get the approved copies returned to you promptly, this letter includes a paragraph that tells the recipient when you expect to get them back. As with many of these letters, this one quietly lays a foundation of legal evidence. Specifically, it gives you a legal framework for claiming a delay, should you not get the submittals back in time.

Price: $5.00 USD

Unconditional Waiver and Release Letter

Caution: This document waives rights unconditionally and states that you have been paid for giving up those rights. This document is enforceable against you if you sign it, even if you have not been paid. If you have not yet been paid, use a conditional release form.

Price: $5.00 USD

Unit Price Estimate Sheet

Use this form to develop prices on a "per unit" basis.

Price: $5.00 USD

Weather Delay Letter

This is a letter regarding delays caused by weather. This letter is a polite but firm request for a job delay allowance due to adverse weather conditions. Note that the power of this letter is that you have a foreman's log to back you up. If you don't, your evidence is thin. You can get old weather reports showing that there was rain, snow, or some other type of difficulty, but you cannot verify the actual conditions of the job site that were caused by the weather.

Price: $5.00 USD